Does Your Social Media Strategy Include Customer Loyalty?

I’m fond of telling people “Men are from Mars, women are from Venus, and I’m from somewhere past Pluto.”  Bear that in mind as I discuss a recent post from one of my favorite bloggers, Katya Andresen, who blogs at Katya’s Non-Profit Marketing Blog. Her post, “10 Simple Ideas For Things To Share On Social Media,” gives you just that. Simple ideas.

Those are good ideas, in and of themselves, but they’re very tactical in nature. From where I sit out here past Pluto, I believe a disclaimer needs to be put on the post stating that there’s more to effective social media use than just this list. It  looks to me like it could have been written 20 years ago about a hard copy newsletter.

Regardless of whether your organization is in the business or nonprofit sector, I believe you need a social media strategy designed to increase the loyalty of your customers, volunteers, or donors, not solely to promote your products or events. In order to execute a strategy focused on loyalty, I would have a mix of posts, both tactical and strategic, in nature. Most of Katya’s list would fall under tactical.

Posts that would be considered “strategic” would be those that are more global in scope. Most donors and volunteers, especially Millennials, want to know how their efforts make a difference when they support a nonprofit. They also want to know where the funds are being used. Even large nonprofits need additional marketing of their client programs. Therefore, in addition to posting about our fundraiser this weekend, I would be sure to complement it with other posts that tell the bigger story such as  posts (some with video and photos) that demonstrated how a volunteer made a difference and where the funds go. As William Sturtevant says in his masterful book about major gifts, The Artful Journey, “The more a donor knows about an organization, the more he or she gives to it.”

I would ask myself, “How will today’s posts help increase customer/volunteer/donor loyalty?” There might be a few that are purely designed to promote an event or program, but they would be a small part of the mix. Many of the posts I would publish would be attempts to start conversations, not just a 21st century version of a news release which I frequently see.

I would create a plan to solicit user-generated content from volunteers and those who benefited from the organization’s services. Donors and volunteers respond better when the post comes from people they can identify with, which is not necessarily an organization’s communications director.

I would attempt to use gamification to make supporters want to come back to our social media platforms over and over again where they could be exposed to these posts. I’d create a badge for bloggers to post on their blogs that, when clicked, would take them to our Web site.

I would also attempt to ensure that my posts provided content relevant to our supporters, not just our organization. And I would work hard to create and respond to conversations.

Katya’s list is good as far as it goes. But please don’t think that’s where it ends. There are already too many organizations out there who see social media as just another one-way conversation channel.

By the way, it’s cold out here past Pluto. Could someone send me a venti dark roast, no room, and a heavy coat?

Why You Should Talk To Your Top Customers or Donors

If you are a business do you know who your top ten customers are:

  • By sales volume?
  • By number of purchases?
  • By territory or store? (Does each territorial or store manager know this?)
  • By product?

If you are a nonprofit, you better know who your top ten donors are, but do you know who:

  • has made the most number of gifts over the last year, regardless of those gifts’ sizes?
  • Makes the largest gifts in each source?
  • has made more gifts in more sources?

What’s the average lifetime revenue of your top ten? How does that compare to your average customer or donor? If there’s a gap between your top ten and your average customer, do you have a plan to cultivate these customers or donors?

Most businesses have loyalty programs, but I’m not talking about those.

What sort of personal touch can you make? A phone call? A handwritten thank you? A single rose in a glass vase?

You don’t think you need to worry about that?

Then you’re sure there’s no danger of your best customers or donors leaving and going to your competition?

Don’t take anything for granted. Even now your competitors may be attempting to woo them away from you.

In sales, there’s a term called, ” Dominant Buying Motive.” What are their’s? Why do they buy from you? Or donate to you if you’re a nonprofit?

Arrange to meet them or at least talk to them over the phone. The purpose of this touch is to thank them for their ongoing support and to discover what it is they like about you and to get their input on how you could do things.

Oh, and if you walk away with some referrals, that’s alright, too.