Your Organization is Not Important!

Another of my “must read” nonprofit bloggers is Kivi’s Nonprofit Communications Blog, by Kivi Leroux Miller. Recently, she hosted the August Nonprofit Blog Carnival where the discussion was centered around the usefulness of hard copy and e-newsletters.

There were many good posts filled with different perspectives on how to improve newsletters as well as discussions about where they fit in with all of our other channels, especially social media.

In a related post, Six Ways Social Media Has Affected Nonprofit Newsletters, one of the comments asked in part: “Do we (meaning nonprofits) still need hard copy newsletters?”

It’s Not About You

My response: It’s not the nonprofit’s needs that are important. It’s the needs of those people you want engaging with you. Do your donors, volunteers, and clients want hard copy newsletters? If you’re a non-profit with a local audience with relatively low email usage, then the answer might be yes.

If you’re an NGO helping a third-world client base and you have Millennial and Gen X donors all over the first world, then you probably don’t need a hard-copy newsletter.

For some, if you properly segment your readers, you may find receptive audiences for each.

If You Write It, Will They Come?

It’s not what you need. It’s what your readers want. Survey your audience, ask them what their preferences are. (VolunteerMatch, one of the nonprofits featured in the nonprofit carnival did just that.)

You need to find out what kind of content they want to read (or scan). Ignore what you learned five, ten, or fifteen years ago at college and find out what they want to read now. Your professors never heard of user-generated content when you were in college. The question you want to ask is, “What kind of content must we produce that will compel our audience to read and then engage with us? For most of us, it will be stories by and about people who have helped our organizations make a difference (volunteers and donors) or who have been helped by our organizations (clients).

Think Like Them, Don’t Think Like Us

Our donors, volunteers, and clients are more important than our organizations. They are our organizations’ lifeblood. Their needs trump the needs of our organizations. Always endeavor to put yourself in their shoes and ask what they want or need. We must continually identify their needs, wants, and motivations and determine how and where they intertwine with our missions. That’s called “Outside-In Thinking,” and you can more about that in my post, When Recruiting Volunteers, Think “Outside-In.

Finding that common ground and building upon it helps us create stronger volunteer and donor bases which make it easier for us to reach our business goals and ultimately fulfill our missions.

Does Your Social Media Strategy Include Customer Loyalty?

I’m fond of telling people “Men are from Mars, women are from Venus, and I’m from somewhere past Pluto.”  Bear that in mind as I discuss a recent post from one of my favorite bloggers, Katya Andresen, who blogs at Katya’s Non-Profit Marketing Blog. Her post, “10 Simple Ideas For Things To Share On Social Media,” gives you just that. Simple ideas.

Those are good ideas, in and of themselves, but they’re very tactical in nature. From where I sit out here past Pluto, I believe a disclaimer needs to be put on the post stating that there’s more to effective social media use than just this list. It  looks to me like it could have been written 20 years ago about a hard copy newsletter.

Regardless of whether your organization is in the business or nonprofit sector, I believe you need a social media strategy designed to increase the loyalty of your customers, volunteers, or donors, not solely to promote your products or events. In order to execute a strategy focused on loyalty, I would have a mix of posts, both tactical and strategic, in nature. Most of Katya’s list would fall under tactical.

Posts that would be considered “strategic” would be those that are more global in scope. Most donors and volunteers, especially Millennials, want to know how their efforts make a difference when they support a nonprofit. They also want to know where the funds are being used. Even large nonprofits need additional marketing of their client programs. Therefore, in addition to posting about our fundraiser this weekend, I would be sure to complement it with other posts that tell the bigger story such as  posts (some with video and photos) that demonstrated how a volunteer made a difference and where the funds go. As William Sturtevant says in his masterful book about major gifts, The Artful Journey, “The more a donor knows about an organization, the more he or she gives to it.”

I would ask myself, “How will today’s posts help increase customer/volunteer/donor loyalty?” There might be a few that are purely designed to promote an event or program, but they would be a small part of the mix. Many of the posts I would publish would be attempts to start conversations, not just a 21st century version of a news release which I frequently see.

I would create a plan to solicit user-generated content from volunteers and those who benefited from the organization’s services. Donors and volunteers respond better when the post comes from people they can identify with, which is not necessarily an organization’s communications director.

I would attempt to use gamification to make supporters want to come back to our social media platforms over and over again where they could be exposed to these posts. I’d create a badge for bloggers to post on their blogs that, when clicked, would take them to our Web site.

I would also attempt to ensure that my posts provided content relevant to our supporters, not just our organization. And I would work hard to create and respond to conversations.

Katya’s list is good as far as it goes. But please don’t think that’s where it ends. There are already too many organizations out there who see social media as just another one-way conversation channel.

By the way, it’s cold out here past Pluto. Could someone send me a venti dark roast, no room, and a heavy coat?

Why You Should Talk To Your Top Customers or Donors

If you are a business do you know who your top ten customers are:

  • By sales volume?
  • By number of purchases?
  • By territory or store? (Does each territorial or store manager know this?)
  • By product?

If you are a nonprofit, you better know who your top ten donors are, but do you know who:

  • has made the most number of gifts over the last year, regardless of those gifts’ sizes?
  • Makes the largest gifts in each source?
  • has made more gifts in more sources?

What’s the average lifetime revenue of your top ten? How does that compare to your average customer or donor? If there’s a gap between your top ten and your average customer, do you have a plan to cultivate these customers or donors?

Most businesses have loyalty programs, but I’m not talking about those.

What sort of personal touch can you make? A phone call? A handwritten thank you? A single rose in a glass vase?

You don’t think you need to worry about that?

Then you’re sure there’s no danger of your best customers or donors leaving and going to your competition?

Don’t take anything for granted. Even now your competitors may be attempting to woo them away from you.

In sales, there’s a term called, ” Dominant Buying Motive.” What are their’s? Why do they buy from you? Or donate to you if you’re a nonprofit?

Arrange to meet them or at least talk to them over the phone. The purpose of this touch is to thank them for their ongoing support and to discover what it is they like about you and to get their input on how you could do things.

Oh, and if you walk away with some referrals, that’s alright, too.

The One True Metric

“I don’t know how many sales they made, but the open rate was up 13%.”

–Email marketer on a webinar about subject lines

About six or seven years ago, my nonprofit created a strategy where event participants could check a box on a registration form when they were interested in increasing their volunteer engagement with us. Once the forms were processed an email would go out to the participant inviting them to click through to a landing page where they could indicate one of four broad areas of interest. This would, in turn, open a ticket and trigger a process where our local offices would follow up to recruit the participant.

Every month we reviewed email metrics showing positive click through rates. But ultimately we canceled the strategy because we couldn’t prove that we had recruited a single volunteer.

The problem was that participants were either misunderstanding what the box on the form meant or they had been “in the moment” at the event and were no longer as interested once they were pinned down. The process itself was also cumbersome and the delay in time no doubt lost us volunteers.

Even those that were interested were hard to contact. The tickets were frequently closed with the comment, “Called three times with no response, then mailed invitation to volunteer orientation.”

We got caught up in the click-through rates and other email metrics. But the goal wasn’t to get high open rates. It was to recruit volunteers.

The number of volunteers recruited was the one true metric. Every other metric pales next to it. And by “volunteers recruited,” I don’t just mean those who sign up. They shouldn’t be counted until they have attended any orientation or training and cleared any background checks. Or, if they don’t need to attend an orientation, then they shouldn’t be counted until they accept a commitment to volunteer for a specific position or task.

Many of you are thinking, “Well, isn’t this the response rate?” In the business sector, usually. Their clicking through takes them to a cart where they purchase the product, or perhaps they download a white paper depending upon the call to action. But in the nonprofit sector, when volunteering is the call to action, the response rate doesn’t necessarily equal the number of people who wind up volunteering.

Now, if your campaign fails to achieve its goal (in this case, volunteer recruitment) then go back and analyze your email metrics. Perhaps your list contained too many uninterested people. Or your subject line didn’t offer value.Or, as in our case, your process might be too cumbersome.

It’s not the click through rate, it’s the number of people who show up to volunteer after they’ve cleared any other background checks or training criteria.

Tell Compelling Stories To Make It Easier to Recruit Volunteers & Raise Funds

In a guest post, Volunteer Recruitment: What Works For Me, on Volunteer Match’s Engaging Volunteers blog, Anni Murray suggests three ways organizations can improve their chances of recruiting volunteers like her.

I’m betting all of our organizations have been guilty of her point about buzzkill. Many of us begin writing posts and articles in the “corporate voice,” rather than a more friendlier one. We all could probably seek out more, better user-generated content as well. Yet we frequently find ourselves on deadline forced to pound out a newsletter article on why we need funds which turns out to be superficial at best. As staff, it allows us to check off a task linked to our performance objectives, but there’s no real attempt to see if it resonates with our target audiences.

Taking the extra step to seek out and find relevant user-generated content can add to your workload in the short term, but pay off big time in the long term as it keeps more readers engaged longer. Let’s say your organization provides client services in your community. Rather than have a staff person write an article for the newsletter, why not solicit a letter from one of your clients and ask her to explain how the program she used made a difference in her life?

Or, do as Anni suggests, and write articles containing specific examples with non-stock item photos. A very good example of this is the newsletter sent out by the Tutwiler Clinic which provides medical assistance to the (way) underserved in Tutwiler, MS. Click on the pdf of their most recent newsletter. You’ll find it written in a friendly informal style as opposed to a “corporate” style. The articles mention how people were helped, and in several cases, their reactions. The photos are obviously not stock, but “home-grown.”

I received this newsletter in the mail the old-fashioned way after my first donation. Because I had only a general idea of what the clinic provided, I opened the newsletter and read it cover to cover–three times in a row without stopping. It’s not that this is a world class newsletter. It’s not. It’s that it spoke to me as a new donor, educating me and captivating me with compelling content that offered specific examples of how they used their donations. A corporate voice could never have done that. I’m now a regular donor.

Don’t just whip out an article. Craft it as the good folks at Tutwiler Clinic do. Better yet, seek out user-generated content from your clients, volunteers, and donors that compels people to support you.

Three Ways To Improve Your Nonprofit Board & Committee Meetings

Having spent 30 years in the nonprofit sector, I’ve attended a great number of volunteer board and committee meetings. Some of them were very productive; most were fairly productive, and then there were many that were a total waste of time. These last were usually the furthest from home and held later in the evenings.

One large board faced particular difficulties. Meetings suffered from low attendance and weren’t effective at setting goals and objectives. Officers and chairs took turns boring each other with oral reports about what had happened in the past.

As the staff liaison with that board, I sat down one day with the president and she and I came up with some simple rules that energized the board and helped to attract new members.

  1. Officer and chair reports of prior activity were required to be submitted in writing. No longer would members be bored by someone reading a long report about what had already happened. These reports were “approved as written,” instead of “approved as read.” Yes, questions could be asked of, say, the treasurer’s report.
  2. Oral reports focused on the time between now and the next meeting. Their time on the agenda moved from reciting what they had done to posing questions to the board about what assistance they needed between now and the next board meeting. This simple change made all the difference. Where reports had been past tense, now they were “future tense.” Board members were asked for their opinions and to be part of decision-making. Boring reports were replaced by energized discussion. Attendance picked up as board members began making a difference in the meetings.
  3. We invited guests. Our board meetings were not closed; they were open to the public, so our third step was to encourage board members to bring guests. Within three meetings this change paid off as we recruited a guest to fill a key committee chairmanship.

It took three or four meetings for board members to adjust to the new normal, but by the end of that time they were seeing the results. Meetings were livelier, better attended, more productive, and they were proud to bring guests, some of whom went on to become volunteers or who helped open other doors for us.

It’s important to note that we still used Roberts Rules of Order as our agenda template. It wasn’t the agenda format that was the problem. It’s what the members did with it that created unproductive meetings.

When you’re having problems with effective board meetings think outside the agenda. Consider what we did and see if it works for you.